Andrew Nacin on How WordPress Evolves Without Breaking Everything – Now With Full Transcript

WordPress.com VIP: Enterprise content management platform

Andrew Nacin is one of the lead developers of WordPress. At the August 2013 Big Media & Enterprise Meetup, he gave a talk on how WordPress evolves while maintaining backwards compatibility — which we shared previously and we’re publishing it again now with the full transcript below. 

My name is Andrew Nacin, I’m a lead developer at WordPress. I live in Washington DC. I’m talking about, really quickly, how WordPress evolves without breaking absolutely everything. I’m going to give two case studies.

First, some general considerations and what I’m talking about for this is three in particular:

  • One, we don’t really rush to fix what isn’t broken. There are a lot of other platforms out there that might rewrite a lot of their API’s pretty much every version, every three years. Just to name a few, like Drupal. We’re not trying to do that; we are trying to evolve…

View original post 3,150 more words

Advertisements

Harvard Business Review and WordPress – Now With Full Transcript

WordPress.com VIP: Enterprise content management platform

Kevin Newman from Harvard Business Publishing, presented “Adapting WordPress’ role within a larger content strategy” at the recent Big Media & Enterprise Meetup in Boston. We’ve shared his presentation previously, and we’re publishing it again now with full transcript below. 

View the presentation slides here:

I can tell a story about where, what blogging means to HBR and what role WordPress plays. A little bit of history first. HBR is a storied print publication. It’s been around for 90+ years, one of the cornerstone publications in management science and practice.

It’s a great product and I love it but right around 2007, 2006, there was a desire to push the boundaries a little bit and get out of the ivory tower, see where our new audiences could be.

This is slightly before my time, I came on board around 2008, so as I started to experiment with different…

View original post 1,563 more words

WordPress Superuser Training Materials now Open Source on GitHub

WordPress.com VIP: Enterprise content management platform

Adding to the previous resources and presentations we’ve released to Documattic, our GitHub repository, we’re happy to release what we think will be a valuable resource for the WordPress community at-large: the WordPress.com VIP Superuser Training course!

The Superuser Training course is aimed at site administrators, site owners, editors, and trainers for large or multi-author sites:

In this course, the participant will learn how to manage and use the WordPress interface from a site owner’s point of view; as someone who will be managing multiple users, their permissions, and ultimately sharing knowledge with them about how to use WordPress to publish a great site with an active community and/or audience. We like to think of this course as teaching your teachers – those who will serve as the WordPress experts in an organization.

The course also does a deep dive into the publishing process so superusers can teach their editors, authors, and…

View original post 302 more words

How Parade.com Uses the WordPress Theme Customizer API – Now With Full Transcript

WordPress.com VIP: Enterprise content management platform

Taylor Buley of Parade.com presented at the Big Media WordPress Meetup in New York City on how his team uses the theme customizer to make editorial changes on the fly. We’ve shared previously, and we’re publishing it again now with full transcript below.

Parade.com/customizer, It’s a Google app, nothing special. What I’m going to try to do is, I’ve done a webinar on this before, so I can talk your ear off on a customize API.

So what I’m going to do is try to be demo focused so I’m going to tell you what I’m going to talk about and show you what exactly is Parade and get into the developer side of it.

By the end, I hope that I’ve convinced the developers to be on the side of the editorial people and that side is the same one we heard earlier, which is I think the…

View original post 5,487 more words

Now With Full Transcript: Austin Smith on Elastic Search on WordPress.com

WordPress.com VIP: Enterprise content management platform

Austin Smith is a managing partner at Alley Interactive, a VIP Featured Partner Agency. At our August Big Media Meetup, he gave a short “flash talk” on Elastic Search on WordPress.com in Action, which we’ve shared previously, and we’re publishing it again now with full transcript below. You can read more about the VIP Search Add-On here, and see it in action at KFF.org.

My name is Austin Smith, I’m a partner at a consulting firm called Alley Interactive, and my main project there is for the Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF), for whom I’m a developer. We went live on VIP in May – feels like so long ago. So what Elastic Search does for KFF is it replaces WordPress core search wholesale and it replaces the technology they were using before which was Google custom search clients.

Using a JSN on their new site…

View original post 1,660 more words

Hacking Cortana: meet *all* of Cortana’s personas!

LeonZandman.com

Last week after Microsoft had released the Windows Phone 8.1 update there was a lot of buzz around Cortana, Windows Phone’s brandnew personal digital assistant. People found out Cortana had all kinds of funny responses to questions they asked her. But one of them was special. It turned out Cortana had an easter egg that triggered the return of the infamous Clippy. If you asked Cortana “Do you like Clippy?”, an animated Clippy would show up instead of the usual Cortana logo.

PersonaAssets720x1280_CLIPPY1_10

I wondered how this Clippy easter egg was triggered. So I fired up Fiddler and set it up so I could spy on my Windows Phone’s HTTP communication. It turned out that when you ask Cortana that question about Clippy, she will initiate a HTTP request to Bing’s servers. Bing responds with a bunch of HTML that seems to consist of two parts. One part is some…

View original post 765 more words

Three lessons for designing for the whole world: Margaret Gould Stewart at TED2014

TED Blog

Margaret Gould Stewart. Photo: James Duncan Davidson Margaret Gould Stewart. Photo: James Duncan Davidson

“What do you think of when I say the word design?” Margaret Gould Stewart, director of product design at Facebook, is here to talk about the kind of design that you normally don’t think about — the design of digital systems that are used by billions of people each day.

As examples, Steward reminds the audience that Google handles 1 billion searches per day. People upload to YouTube more in a single day than all of the US television networks broadcast in the last 5 years combined. Facebook transmits the photos, messages and stories of over 1.23 billion people, or about 1/6 of humanity.

“What’s really hard at designing at scale,” she says, “is that it requires a bizarre combination of two things, audacity and humility.” Audacity to believe that what you’re doing is important, and humility because it’s not about the designer’s portfolio…

View original post 890 more words